Linked Double Crochet Stitch (LDC)

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The Linked Double Crochet Stitch, abbreviated LDC, is a great stitch to have in your roster. It’s got the height of double crochet stitches, but because each stitch is linked, or joined in the middle of the post, you don’t get the holes and gaps you get with standard double crochet stitches. It creates a much more solid fabric than double crochet, without the thickness or stiffness of single crochet. Here’s how it’s done!

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

Linked Double Crochet Video Tutorial

Linked Double Crochet Photo Tutorial

The video and photo tutorial feature Lion Brand Thick & Quick in Mystical; the photos feature an N (10mm) hook from Craftwich Creations.

The Linked Double Crochet stitch can be worked over any number of stitches. To start, chain the desired number of stitches, and then ch 3 more.

To make the first Linked Double Crochet in the foundation chain: Ch 3 and insert the hook in the 2nd ch from the hook. Yo and pull up a loop.

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

 

Insert the hook in the 4th ch from the hook, and yo and pull up a loop.

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

Yo and pull through the first two loops on the hook, yo and pull through the last 2 loops on the hook (as for a regular double crochet).

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3
To make the next Linked Double Crochet: Insert the hook down through the horizontal bar in the center of the stem of the previous stitch, yo and pull up a loop.

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3 Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3 Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

Insert the hook into the next chain, and yo and pull up a loop.

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

Yo and pull through the first two loops on the hook, yo and pull through the last 2 loops on the hook.

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

Repeat to the end of the chain (or as indicated).

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

To start the next row of Linked Double Crochet: (Turn after the previous row.) Ch 3 and insert the hook in the 2nd ch from the hook. Yo and pull up a loop.

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

Insert the hook in the first st of the row, and yo and pull up a loop.

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

Yo and pull through the first two loops on the hook, yo and pull through the last 2 loops on the hook (as for a regular double crochet).

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

Continue along the row as for the next Linked Double Crochet above, working into each subsequent stitch (or as indicated).

Learn how to make the Linked Double Crochet Stitch! Video & Photo Tutorial on Moogly <3

Linked Double Crochet, and its taller sister Linked Treble Crochet, are going to be very simple for those who are familiar with Tunisian crochet. And if you’re not familiar with Tunisian, linked stitches are a great way to get a taste for it! They’re not Tunisian stitches as such, but if you can do one, you can do the other. One big difference is that you do turn your work when working linked stitches – and you’ll note that the back and the front look a little different because of that horizontal bar linking. I hope you’ve enjoyed learning this stitch, and give it a try soon! One quick project to try it out with is the Christmas Tree Coffee Cozy!

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Comments

  1. 3

    Snow says

    How would this work in the round? I make crocheted hats using sc so there aren’t a lot of holes so I can sew stuff on. My concern is that there would be a holey section where I join. Is there a way to get around this issue?

    • 4

      Tamara Kelly says

      This is a common question – and it’s a little tricky, so you don’t see it often. You can work them in a spiral instead of in joined rounds to get around the issue. The only other way I’ve seen is to insert the hook under both the horizontal bar to the right, and then again under the bar to the left, before pulling up the center loop. Tricky indeed!

          • 7

            says

            Did you ever make a video for doing this in the round? I’m thinking that when making ‘beanie hats’ this would be a great stitch to use. I’m going to try the method of going to the right, then back to the left horizontal bar and see what happens :)

    • 11

      Tamara Kelly says

      I would increase and decrease the same way you would with regular dc sts! To increase, just work another LDC into the same st, linking to the previous one. To decrease, work the first LDC until there are 2 loops left on the hook, then make the next one linking to the first one “in progress.” Is that clear?

  2. 13

    Romy Williams says

    This addition to the standard double crochet stitch is totally awesome! I’m using it on a scarf for my son and it looks amazing. Thanks for sharing this with all of us!

  3. 14

    Frances says

    I imagine if you wanted to make it look the same on each side, as you mentioned turning and the patterns looking different in rows, you could simply think of it as similar to bpdc and take the back horizontal bars instead of the front ones. Tricky, and I’d have to test it myself, but probably doable.

  4. 16

    Sarah says

    For a Tunisian take on this, check out the designer Aoibhe Ni on Ravelry – she also has some great videos on YouTube. I’d have to work the stitches side by side to figure out if there’s a difference particularly between her linked uple stitches and regular linked crochet stitches, but she also works them in some really long linked stitches, multiples of 4-6 or sometimes more, and works the rows vertically across the width of the piece. Generally speaking I think she works the return row as double crochet, so the fabric is always the same on the “right” side and has a decided stripe to it.

    I’m not sure whether or not this’ll work but I happened to have had a picture of a swatch with me practising this that I uploaded to show someone else. This swatch has some increases and some rows of half treble (American half double) but it’s largely done in the linked stitches in the way I learned from her:

    Not shown in this swatch are her methods for working Tunisian lace in this method, because I’m still getting my brain round that. Well worth checking out, though!

    I ended up back on Moogly again (I always end up here!) because I was trying to figure out the difference(s), if there are any, between these two styles. Either way, I really love the fabric it produces. I worked that swatch in a mercerised cotton and it has the most gorgeous feel and drape to it.

  5. 18

    Wendy J says

    Thank you for all your posts! This is great! I had started looking around to see if you had standing HDC, like the standing DC, but this looked good, so I meandered over here. I’m so tempted to frog the baby hat I just finished! I’ve alternated my rows between HDC & DC, because of the holes; this stitch is so nice! I won’t have to do that any more. I love your site, and your many hints. (Off to find the standing HDC.)

  6. 20

    Irene says

    It looked like you crocheted in the ridge of the chain. Is it easier to do it that way or to crochet in the chain?

    • 21

      Tamara Kelly says

      I think it’s easier, and I like the finished bottom edge it creates – but everyone has their own preference!

  7. 22

    says

    Thank you so much for this tutorial- I finally understand this stitch and can make a pattern I bought with it in but didn’t explain it. Huzzah!

  8. 26

    Kim says

    Tamara, I have tried & tried to decrease in ldc, but I’m not getting much of a bend in the valley. I’m trying to make a wave/ripple baby blanket using this stitch ’cause I like “no holes” in baby blankets. Is there any further explanation you can give or a video. I would really appreciate any help. Thank you.

    • 27

      Tamara Kelly says

      Hm, I can’t say I’ve ever tried to decrease with this stitch before! I know you said you like no holes, but maybe skipping a stitch in the middle of the linked decrease would give the look you’re going for? Or a decrease over 3 sts, instead of 2? It’s something you’d have to play with a bit for sure.

  9. 30

    Beth says

    This is awesome! YOU are awesome beyond belief! Thank you thank you for your tutorial! (I just pdf’d it!)

    I came across a pattern with (ldc) abbreviated, but no full explanation of the stitch itself, just some cryptic nonsense about “insert hook, pull up loop, then into stitch, pull up loop, then yo and pull loop through 2 loops and then 2 more”… I was doing a modified cluster!

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