Increasing and Decreasing in Foundation Double Crochet

After sharing how to work Foundation Single Crochet, Foundation Half Double Crochet, and Foundation Double Crochet, how to Join a Round of Foundation Stitches to Work in the Round, and how to Extend a Row with Foundation Stitches – I thought I had pretty well covered it all when it comes to foundation stitches! But a question on Facebook made me realize there was one topic I hadn’t addressed just yet. So here’s how to increase and decrease while working foundation stitches!

Yes, you can increase and decrease while making Foundation #Crochet Stitches! Learn all about it in this video and photo tutorial from Mooglyblog.com

Disclaimer: This post includes affiliate links.

How to Increase and Decrease in Foundation Double Crochet Photo Tutorial

Both the video and photo tutorials were made using Lion Brand Cotton-Ease yarn and a US-I, 5.5mm Furls Fiberarts hook - click on either of those to buy your own! But of course these stitches will work with any yarn and the appropriate hook.

Increasing and decreasing can be done with any height of foundation stitches – it’s all about keeping it straight in your mind, which loop is the chain and which loop is the start of the stitch. That, and remembering what you’d do if you were working the stitches into a standard starting chain. I’m using FDC here because it’s one of the more common, and lends itself well to the demonstration. So let’s take it step by step.

INCREASING:

When you are increasing, you’re working two or more full stitches into the same chain stitch. So to do this in Foundation Double Crochet, you’re going to work the first FDC as usual, and then work the stitches you are increasing by into the same “chain.” When you work a normal FDC, you pull up one loop to act as the chain, and a second to act as the first loop of the dc. So the second dc is worked into the same “chain” as the first FDC – skip the first chain loop, and just work the stitch! That’s it!

Yes, you can increase and decrease while making Foundation #Crochet Stitches! Learn all about it in this video and photo tutorial from Mooglyblog.com Yes, you can increase and decrease while making Foundation #Crochet Stitches! Learn all about it in this video and photo tutorial from Mooglyblog.com Yes, you can increase and decrease while making Foundation #Crochet Stitches! Learn all about it in this video and photo tutorial from Mooglyblog.com

DECREASING:

When you are decreasing, you’re working two or more partial stitches across the same number of chains, and then finishing them all as one stitch. So to do this in FDC, you’re going to pull up the chain loop, then pull up another loop to start the st, then yo and pull through 2 loops, leaving 2 loops on the hook. Then go back into the chain of the stitch just started, pull up another chain loop, pull up another loop to start the second stitch and then yo and pull through 2 loops, leaving 3 loops on the hook. Then if it’s a dc3tog, as shown below, you’ll do it all again till you have 3 sts started and 4 loops left on the hook… and then yo and pull through all 4 loops!

Yes, you can increase and decrease while making Foundation #Crochet Stitches! Learn all about it in this video and photo tutorial from Mooglyblog.com Dec-step-2 Yes, you can increase and decrease while making Foundation #Crochet Stitches! Learn all about it in this video and photo tutorial from Mooglyblog.com Yes, you can increase and decrease while making Foundation #Crochet Stitches! Learn all about it in this video and photo tutorial from Mooglyblog.com

That’s really all there is to it! Using these techniques you can even start a ripple pattern with foundation stitches – a notoriously difficult stitch pattern to get the chains right on.

Yes, you can increase and decrease while making Foundation #Crochet Stitches! Learn all about it in this video and photo tutorial from Mooglyblog.com

I love using foundation stitches, because you never have to worry about counting out tiny chains. They won’t work for every pattern, but I hope this helps you see how you too can use them more often! Even if you are supposed to chain between stitches, it’s possible to use foundation stitches – just make the chains before you yarn over and go back into the “chain” at the bottom of the previous FDC.

If it’s something you haven’t seen done before, just try it! It’s only yarn! And be sure to click on any of the links above for more info!

Like what you see? Let me know! Then check out all the other Moogly goodies on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, G+, Tumblr, and in the FREE weekly email newsletter!

Thank you JORD Watches for sponsoring this tutorial video! To learn more about the watch I’m wearing in this video, click on the ad below!


Print Friendly

Comments

  1. 1

    Purple Unicorn says

    Tamara, I just Love, Love, Love your crocheting rythm! I have seen a lot of videos in the past few months since I have discovered crochet blogs and YouTube videos. Yours is the best rythm that I have seen. It’s so relaxing to watch you work. I am getting back into crochet after a fairly long hiatus and did not realize how much there is on the internet. I check your blog and a few others every morning to start my day. You have such beautiful patterns and they are so easy to read and follow. Thanks for being there for me!!

  2. 3

    Paula says

    Firstly, allow me to say how helpful I find your tutorials. However, I’m not understanding your comment about how to chain between foundation stitches – I’d love to know as I’ve rejected patterns on that basis as I hate a tight chain!

    • 4

      Tamara Kelly says

      Hi Paula, thank you! I show it at the very end of the video. For instance sometimes in a pattern it’ll tell you to make a V st into the starting chain – where you dc, then ch, then dc, all into the same chain. You can do that in foundation sts too – just make the first foudation stitch, make the chains, and then make an increase st in the first foundation stitch. Does that make sense?

        • 6

          Tamara Kelly says

          I thought afterwards I should have shown that too! Hindsight! Yes, to do that you would just make more chains in the chain section. So let’s say you yo as to dc, and go into the bottom of the previous stitch and pull up a loop that counts as the next chain. Then, yo and pull up another loop – but instead of making it the bottom of the dc, call it the chain of the dc, and leave the first loop or chain unworked. So to finish the dc, yo and pull up a third loop, and then finish the dc as normal (pull through two, pull through two.) It’ll be a little wobbly, but as you continue working the next st it’ll stabilize the dc. Does that help?

          • 7

            Paula says

            Yes! It makes sense just to add more chain sts to the chain section. I couldn’t see how to do that as I’m still not that experienced with foundation stitches.

          • 8

            Tamara Kelly says

            Glad that made sense! I wish I’d thought to include it in the video! :)

  3. 9

    Carol says

    This is brilliant and so very well explained. I look forward to using this very helpful technique really soon. Thanks.

  4. 10

    says

    I am wondering if the instructions are the same when working a regular starting chain. I don’t have any trouble using the the starting chain and really don’t care to try and change the method I currently use. If they are different could you please give a tutorial using the regular chain ?? Thank you. Nancy

    • 11

      Tamara Kelly says

      Hi Nancy! Increasing and decreasing into a regular chain is just like increasing and decreasing over any set of stitches. :)

  5. 15

    Kandi Heilman says

    I’m curious if you think mixing foundation stitches in the foundation row would work well. For example doing 2 fdc then 2 fsc repeatedly?

Trackbacks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>