Griddle Stitch

The Griddle Stitch, also known as the Cobble Stitch, is a simple stitch pattern that is perfect for beginners who are ready for some texture! All you need to know how to do is chain, single crochet, and double crochet. And of course count your stitches! Here’s how to work the Griddle Stitch.

Learn how to #crochet the Griddle Stitch! Video tutorial, photo tutorial, and crochet chart from Mooglyblog.com

Disclaimer: This post includes affiliate links.

How to Crochet the Griddle Stitch Video Tutorial

How to Crochet the Griddle Stitch Photo Tutorial

To work the Griddle Stitch, you start with a multiple of 2 sts, with 2 more for the base chain. You can, of course, use any size yarn and the appropriate hook. For this tutorial I used Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice and a Furls Fiberarts US-I, 5.5mm hook.

In this example, I’m starting with a foundation chain of 12 – that’s 2 multiplied by 5, plus 2. To start the first row, skip the first 3 chains – those will count as the first dc st. Then work 1 sc into the next ch, then dc into the next ch. Continue alternating between sc and dc until you end the row with a sc in the last ch. Turn.

Learn how to #crochet the Griddle Stitch! Video tutorial, photo tutorial, and crochet chart from Mooglyblog.com

For row 2, you’ll ch 3 (once again, this counts as the first dc), and then sc in the next ch, and then dc in the ch after that. Continue to alternate as before, ending with a sc st in the top of the ch 3 that started the previous row.

Learn how to #crochet the Griddle Stitch! Video tutorial, photo tutorial, and crochet chart from Mooglyblog.com

And then… repeat row 2 until you’re done! That’s all there is to is – alternating dc and sc sts, with the dc sts worked into sc sts, and the sc sts worked into dc sts. You could start the row with sc and end with dc if you prefer. And you can work the Griddle Stitch in the round too if you like – just as long as you have an even number of stitches to work with.

Learn how to #crochet the Griddle Stitch! Video tutorial, photo tutorial, and crochet chart from Mooglyblog.com

I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial! The Griddle Stitch is easy enough for beginners, and it creates a fantastic texture too. In fact, this stitch pattern makes up the back of the Pampering Massage Soap Saver! Now for the chart!

Learn how to #crochet the Griddle Stitch! Video tutorial, photo tutorial, and crochet chart from Mooglyblog.com

Thank you JORD Watches for sponsoring this tutorial video! To learn more about the watch I’m wearing in this video, click on the ad below!


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Comments

  1. 1

    Sandy says

    Another great video and help for my library when I start something and need help. Thank you, thank you!!!! You are a great inspiration to my crochet!!!

    • 4

      Tamara Kelly says

      I do! I think I hold it a little bit awkwardly in some of the videos because I’m trying to make sure the camera can see what I’m doing lol. But it is very comfortable to use for crocheting! :D

    • 8

      Tamara Kelly says

      Hi! I’m using an I hook in this video, and I linked it in the write up underneath the video. :) (I removed your email address so spammers wouldn’t pick it up)

  2. 9

    says

    I’ve used this stitch a couple of times now… didn’t know the name for it! lol
    Love the texture of it… with a soft yarn, it worked great for a special request
    neck warmer I hooked…

  3. 11

    says

    Gave it a try. My edges aren’t coming out as straight as yours looks in the picture. I have counted my stitches and am finishing on the last stitch.

    • 14

      Tamara Kelly says

      Hi Rhonda! To increase or decrease in this pattern you could use any of the usual methods – the key is to keep working dc sts into sc sts and vice versa. It doesn’t really matter if you start a row with sc or dc, as long as the right stitch is worked into each. Working in the round you’d need to work in twos, in order to keep the stitch pattern working. Increasing in rows would be easiest – just work 2 sts (a sc and dc) into two of the sts in the previous row. In the end, the method that works best will depend a lot on the type of item/pattern you’re making.

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